Oracle still on acquisition trail snapping up Sun

Wednesday, 22 April, 2009


Oracle Corporation and Sun Microsystems have announced they have entered into a definitive agreement under which Oracle will acquire Sun common stock for $9.50 per share in cash. The transaction is valued at approximately $7.4 billion, or $5.6 billion net of Sun’s cash and debt. “ We estimate that the acquired business will contribute over $1.5 billion to Oracle’s non-GAAP operating profit in the first year, increasing to over $2 billion in the second year. This would make the Sun acquisition more profitable in per share contribution in the first year than we had planned for the acquisitions of BEA, PeopleSoft and Siebel combined,” said Oracle President Safra Catz.

There are substantial long-term strategic customer advantages to Oracle owning two key Sun software assets: Java and Solaris. Java is one of the computer industry’s best-known brands and most widely deployed technologies, and it is the most important software Oracle has ever acquired. Oracle Fusion Middleware is built on top of Sun’s Java language and software. Oracle can now ensure continued innovation and investment in Java technology for the benefit of customers and the Java community.

The Sun Solaris operating system is the leading platform for the Oracle database, Oracle’s largest business, and has been for a long time. With the acquisition of Sun, Oracle can optimise the Oracle database for some of the unique, high-end features of Solaris.

“Oracle and Sun have been industry pioneers and close partners for more than 20 years,” said Sun Chairman Scott McNealy. “This combination is a natural evolution of our relationship and will be an industry-defining event.”

The Board of Directors of Sun Microsystems has unanimously approved the transaction. It is anticipated to close this summer (Northern Hemisphere), subject to Sun stockholder approval, certain regulatory approvals and customary closing conditions.

Industry analysts have predicted that Oracle will divest the company of between 10,000 and 15,000 employees over the first two years, saving Oracle billions of dollars annually.

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